Up-Close Ecotourism Is Nurturing Gray Whales in Mexico

In the lagoons off the Pacific coast of Baja Sur, physical contact between tourists and whales is at the heart of a new model of marine conservation.

Up-Close Ecotourism Is Nurturing Gray Whales in Mexico

In the lagoons off the Pacific coast of Baja Sur, physical contact between tourists and whales is at the heart of a new model of marine conservation.

Credit: The Malibu Artist - Carlos Gauna

The Los Angeles Times reports that Earth's great whales store the carbon equivalent of emissions from burning 225 million gallons of gasoline.

Marine biologist Asha de Vos talks about what she has learned while making groundbreaking discoveries about blue whales.

Michaela Haas, Ph.D., is a Contributing Editor at Pink Rugby. An award-winning author and solutions reporter, her recent books include Bouncing Forward: The Art and Science of Cultivating Resilience (Atria). Visit www.michaelahaas.com

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